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Inking up for charity

Inking up for charity

Coin trails, raffles and dress-up days are fundraising staples for childcare centres that get behind the Cancer Society’s annual Daffodil Day appeal.

But last year, New Shoots in Tauranga decided to brainstorm some new fundraising ideas.

Early childhood teacher Troy Pedersen-Burbery was happy to come to the party, putting his body on the line to raise money for the Cancer Society by offering to add a daffodil to his collection of tattoos. But, it was up to friends, colleagues and families at the centre to choose where the tattoo would go. 

“It was fun to come up with something different and a little off the wall,” says Troy. 

“People who shave their head are amazing, but I couldn’t do it! I thought a tattoo was a cool way to show support and the daffodil is a recognisable image for cancer.”  

It also has special meaning for Troy. 

“Cancer has hit my family really hard. My Grandma was hard to lose. I wanted to do something memorable, not just for my family, but for anyone affected by cancer. 

“People who go through treatment are amazing, especially my Grandma. She was diagnosed my first year in college. I’d walk past the hospital every day on my way home after school and visit her — so losing her was a really big thing for me.” 

When New Shoots started Daffodil Day fundraising last August, alongside the raffle prizes and cupcakes for sale, there were four jars — each labelled for Troy’s ribs, collarbone, calf and thigh.  

Votes were cast by adding donations to the jars. The jar with the most cash by Daffodil Day won, and now Troy has a 10cm, full-colour daffodil inked on his ribs. 

New Shoots Tauranga centre director, Carol Bull, says Daffodil Day is a highly anticipated event on the centre’s calendar. 

“We love being able to support charities like the Cancer Society. We believe children benefit greatly from being involved with community events as it provides positive experiences and helps them connect and develop empathy with those around them, and they begin to develop a sense of contribution and responsibility for their wider social environments.” 

Cancer has hit my family really hard. My Grandma was hard to lose. I wanted to do something memorable, not just for my family, but for anyone affected by cancer.

Troy Pedersen-Burbery